Why the Progress You Make in the Practice Room Seems to Disappear Overnight

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Have you ever been frustrated by the fact that you can take a difficult passage, work on it for a bit, get it sounding pretty good, but return to the practice room the next day to discover that you’re back at square 1? That nothing has really changed? And despite how good it sounded yesterday, now it sounds just as bad as it did before you worked on it?

Most of us can live with “two steps forward, one step back.” It’s the “two steps forward, two steps back” that makes us want to tear our hair out.

So what are we to do? Are we just supposed to keep at it and learn how to be more patient? Or is there a different way to practice that can make these improvements more permanent?

Enter Christine Carter

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Sight and sound of music

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A piano is not just a musical instrument but also a piece of furniture that becomes the focal point of the room.

Steinway & Sons Model O piano
A piano naturally becomes the focal point of the room in which it is placed. The Steinway & Sons Model O piano, retailing up to $80,000, is often called the “Living Room Grand” because its 5-foot 10 3/4-inch length fits most rooms.

A piano hits all the right notes in the homes of those who have musicality in mind. But, being a proficient piano player isn’t a prerequisite to having a music room, which can bring a note of sophistication to your house.

Not only can a piano be a key furnishing, it also becomes the focal point of the room in which it is placed, says Robert Berger, spokesman for Steinway & Sons in New York City.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/09/21/3637558/sight-and-sound-of-music.html#storylink=cpy

The Secret Life of Piano Tuners

Hear from the people who keep New Zealand’s pianos sounding sweet, from old dingers to Steinway grands. We meet the man who tuned Paul McCartney’s family “joanna” and hear stories of the itinerant piano tuners who were much sought after in 19th century New Zealand. (24′19″)

Three Approaches to Piano Restoration

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Conservative | Modern | Innovative. 

  • With the conservative approach, the restorer places a high priority on preserving as much of the original instrument as possible.
  • With the modern approach, the restorer attempts to make the piano only as good as it was when new, closely maintaining the original design.
  • With the innovative approach, the restorer not only replaces worn parts with new, but also feels free to modify the design of the instrument in any way that, in the restorer’s judgment, would make it perform better — even in ways the manufacturer never contemplated and might not approve of. 

In this article, several well-respected piano restorers, each approximately representing one of the above positions, explain their approaches to restoration in general and, specifically, how they might be applied to various eras of Steinway grands.

Read more at: Three Approaches to Piano Restoration: – PianoBuyer